The Effects of Contact Exposure

contact exposure cannabis
Cannabis joint
Cannabis joint

One of the more common questions often asked at local cannabis shops and in the FAQ sections of online marijuana dispensaries is the age old question, “Can I get a contact high from cannabis?” This is a serious question for many as non-users are not only concerned with accidently getting high but are often concerned with failing drug tests through contact exposure. I did some research and asked those in the know and this is what I found.

When weed is smoked or vaporized, cannabinoids are absorbed into the bloodstream via the lungs. If one were to inhale deeply and hold the smoke in the lungs for a few seconds before exhaling, almost all the cannabinoids in the smoke or vapour is absorbed into the bloodstream, however, not all users follow this practice. According to the best online dispensary in Canada, approximately half of the cannabinoids are present in the air when the average user is involved. Though this may not seem like a great amount it nevertheless causes those concerned with contact exposure some alarm. My friends from the various mail order marijuana outlets and online dispensaries in Canada have said this no real reason for concern as studies have shown that in instances where non-smokers were grouped with smokers for 90 minutes in a ventilated area, there were only minimal levels of cannabinoids in their blood and urine shortly thereafter and not nearly enough to fail a drug test. In other words, unless the non-smoker was in a hotbox situation for an extended period of time, there is no reason for alarm.

Though it is unlikely to get high from second hand cannabis smoke, my friends from the best online dispensary in Canada stated that there are other side effects that are not often considered. If a non-smoker is exposure to marijuana smoke for a long period of time, they may have symptoms of lightheaded or dizziness and may feel tired or lethargic. Contact exposure may also exasperate breathing problems for those that suffer from lung ailments and may inadvertently worsen some mental health conditions such as depression.

If a non-smoker happens upon a situation where contact exposure is unavoidable, they need not necessarily worry especially if it is in passing (such as a whiff through an open window), however, they need to be aware that though they may not get high from contact exposure they may feel other effects. Nevertheless, my friends from the local cannabis shops and various online dispensaries in Canada always make it a point to stress upon their clients that it is their responsibility to be considerate of others. Children and pets should be kept away from smoke and the user should always ask for permission prior to lighting up. Users should try to smoke or vape in a well ventilated area and be mindful of others and not encroach upon their space. Though the use of cannabis in Canada is legally now, we still need to be considerate of those who choose not partake.

 

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